February 6, 2012

Learning From My Mistakes

Posted in Project Management tagged , , , , at 11:51 AM by Solutions2Projects, LLC

I ran my second half marathon yesterday and based on my training, expected to come in at 2 hours and beat my first race time of 2:06.  Training times supported this expectation as two weeks prior to the race, I ran 12.6 miles at a 9:09 pace.  Reality didn’t match expectations and not only did I not reach my 2 hour goal, but I exceeded by first race time by 2 minutes.  It was a very disappointing experience and one I don’t intend to repeat in my next races.  Rather than looking at the experience as a complete failure (I held a personal pity party yesterday), I am choosing to learn from it.  The success here was that I finished despite having to run and walk the last 5 miles of the race. What I learned was the following:

  • Do not train beyond 10 miles prior to the race (I peaked too early)
  • Do not play soccer the Thursday before the race (my legs were tired)
  • Do not participate in any quad workout the week prior to the race (I had a softball coaching clinic with lots of knee bends the day before)
  • Keep the mileage up until a week before the race, then taper (I tapered too early)
  • Set my own pace and go with what is comfortable for me on that day, at that time
  • Running a race alone is tough for me and requires super mental toughness that I need to train for

 This is all valuable information and information I, personally, could only gain from failure.  Other experienced runners provided me with some guidance that I ignored thinking it wouldn’t apply to me as a seasoned athlete.  I may be a seasoned athlete but I am not a seasoned runner.   

 What is relevant here is that I made some fairly sizable tactical errors, still completed the race, and I plan to learn from the errors. 

 The same holds true with any projects I manage in that the results of a decision or series of decisions may not be as expected.  The first goal is to recover from the errors and the second goal is to learn from the mistakes.  I am constantly looking for ways to learn from previous experiences to improve processes and make things more efficient even if it was a total success.  Actually, I apply this to all aspects of my life as accepting mediocrity and the status quo is not acceptable. 

 No project ever goes according to plan.  Assumptions change.  Resources change.  Expectations change.  Situations change.  There will be mistakes, some more costly than others.  The important thing is to learn from the mistakes and apply the newfound wisdom to the next situation so as to avoid a disappointing repeat performance.

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December 9, 2011

The Rhythm of Projects and Half Marathons

Posted in General tagged , , , , at 11:52 AM by Solutions2Projects, LLC

I recently ran my first half marathon after training for nine weeks and realized that the rhythm of a computerized system implementation project (for me at least) mimicked the rhythm of running a half marathon.
At the start of a race, similar to the start of an implementation, there is excitement, apprehension, jostling for position, and general anxiety. Project team members are excited about solving an existing problem with a new system but are uncertain about how their respective jobs will be impacted by the changes that will be made which causes anxiety. In order to alleviate that anxiety, folks in an organization jockey for position to ensure that they can positively influence the changes or avoid them entirely. Some may put themselves in positions of leadership and control or find a way to avoid completely.
As you move from the starting gate and begin to establish your own pace, you feel a sense of relief that it’s finally underway and a bit of a thrill that it’s finally happening. On a project, the (seemingly endless) planning is behind you and there’s finally progress toward the actual goal. There is cheering from the executive sponsor (similar to my family cheering me on at mile 2) and the project moves on.
Eventually, the excitement and relief fade as you pass the first few mile markers. Yes, there’s been some accomplishment but then there is the realization that there is quite a bit more to go. At this point, it’s extremely important for the project manager to keep the team motivated, focused on the overall objective, and give team members a sense of accomplishment. It also helps to have some cheering from the sidelines to reinforce the importance of the project and provide a sense of appreciation from outside the project team. This is a great time for rewards (even small tokens help) and cheering from the business sponsor similar to the cheering from the sidelines from friends, family members, or complete strangers. The boost takes you through a couple more miles and a couple more deliverables on a project.
A few more miles tick by and you feel like you are in the home stretch. Some of the big miles or milestones have been accomplished and it feels good. You get a renewed sense of energy and purpose and realize that it’s actually possible to meet your goal. It actually becomes possible to visualize the end even though you can’t see the finish line.
And then it gets hard again. For me it was at 10.5 miles. I was thrilled at how far I’d run and impressed I’d made it that far. But then I did some math and realized I still had 2.6 miles to go. I hadn’t trained beyond one 9 mile run and two eight mile runs. I wasn’t going to stop but I knew it was going to be hard. I put my head down and focused on completing the run…one step, one quarter mile, one half mile at a time. I broke it down into manageable chunks and gave myself kudos for every quarter mile. I closely monitored my progress to remind myself of how little there was left to meet my goal.
I do the same with a project team. The project team is tired at this point. While they know the end is near, the finish line seems so far away because of all of the little things left at the end of a project and none of them are fun. This includes data clean up and migration, data set up, work instruction and procedure finalization, training, and closing out documentation. At this point, the little deliverables don’t give much of a sense of accomplishment but it takes the project team closer to the go live date one step at a time. As a project manager, it’s critical to keep the project team members focused on checking these off and not getting distracted by what seems to be an endless list. Cheering from the business sponsor is helpful here, too.
As with every project I manage, once I see the finish line, I pick up the pace and use every last bit of energy to push across the finish line. Sometimes I have to push and pull the project team members along me but we must all cross together. We started as a team and we will finish as a team.
The elation you feel crossing the finish line lasts for a brief period of time before the letdown begins. There’s no longer a focused sense of purpose associated with a project. After the race, I looked back and said to myself, ‘well, now what?’ I walked back to the hotel to meet up with my family and we resumed the day. It is similar on a project. Once the project is over, most project team members return to their day jobs and work to get into a new comfort zone now that the new system is in place. It’s often uncomfortable and takes some time to get used to. Things will not be the same as they were.
At Solutions2Projects, LLC we recognize that computerized system implementations are not easy and that change is uncomfortable for most people. For most implementations, we recommend having incentives, rewards and project tracking and love to center them around a theme. On one project, our theme was ‘around the world in 88 days.’ To keep the company informed (and provide the team with a sense of progress) we had a map with marked destinations and as we reached milestones, we marked them on the map. Each milestone was in a different country and had a reward associated with that company. The rewards were small but the gesture appreciated by the team members. We celebrated the project completion with an America-themed end of project party since our destination was the Bay Area.
As a project manager, recognizing that there are going to be hills and valleys during an implementation helps to remove the surprise associated with the downs. This will provide you with the power to manage through the phases knowing that there is an easier time coming up and that eventually, there will be a finish line. I suppose that’s the great thing about projects…there’s always a beginning, a middle, and an end. At the end there should always be a celebration as the process to get there is never easy. And, once the project is over, as with this race, it’s time to find another one!